Privacy Matters

Colorado police "would love to" use face recognition technology in body camera systems

Police in Colorado say they would be happy to use face recognition technology in their body camera system, but would want to make sure communities support the move before doing so.

The biometrics industry website BiometricUpdate.com reports:

See some surveillance technology in your Boston hood? Add it to this crowdsourced map

For a few reasons, it's to date been impossible to create a map of surveillance cameras and other spy devices in Boston. For one thing, the City of Boston has previously refused to disclose to the ACLU the locations of its hundreds of networked surveillance cameras, many of which were purchased with DHS funds. Another complication is that many other agencies in the city have their own camera systems, including the MBTA and the Department of Transportation, to name just two.

Boston man accused of urinating on, attacking Latino homeless man tells police Donald Trump inspired him

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump used to say reasonable things about immigration policy, for example calling for comprehensive reform and a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. But now he's running for the nation's highest office in the GOP primary, and his rhetoric has taken a sharp turn toward the virulently xenophobic.

"See Something, Say Something—Unless It's Police Brutality"

Today the ACLU of Massachusetts filed suit against two officers from the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority police department for civil rights violations against our client Mary Holmes, pictured above. From the ACLU's website:

Chicago police rifled through anti-Olympics organizers' trash, sent undercover cops to meetings

What's the purpose of the police? Is it to protect public safety? Or is it to protect elite interests by undermining political opposition that runs the risk of interfering with those interests?

Hard won public records from Chicago now show the police department spied on anti-Olympics protesters, sending undercover agents to meetings, combing through activists' trash, and more.

The Chicago Reader reports:

Amazon takes workplace surveillance to the next level by incentivizing employees to report on each other

Amazon's corporate offices encourage white collar employees to use an electronic reporting tool to tell their managers how their colleagues are doing on the job. Unsurprisingly, this practice results in some bad outcomes for workers.

From a fascinating and disturbing New York Times profile of Amazon's unorthodox business practices:

Manhattan DA wants you to think his office is starving for information, but they know more about you than ever before

Photo credit.

The New York Times today published a fear-mongering op-ed by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, warning that commercial encryption services offered by Apple and Google endanger society by protecting criminals from police and prosecutors.

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